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About Mr. McGregor's Fence® and How It Protects Gardens


Background

Mr. McGregor'sFence® is named for the gentleman gardener in Beatrix Potter's "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" whose frustration immortalized the problem faced by millions of vegetable gardeners who see their crops damaged or destroyed by rabbits, woodchucks, skunks, dogs, cats and other critters. Mr. McGregor's Fence® is the easy, affordable, and intelligent solution to every gardener's worst nightmare. It is harmless to animals, pets, and children, simple to set up, involves no below-ground digging, and needs minimal gating--because it is so low you can step over it.

From time immemorial, gardeners have tried to fence out critters. But some critters are very smart; and a simple barrier fence, regardless of size, just challenges them to figure out an attack plan - whether to dig under or climb over it. And aside from not working very well, these simple barrier fences are expensive and hard to install.

Others discovered that the zap from an electric fence can persuade many critters to go home. They also discovered, however, that electric fences formed with single or paired wires are not difficult for critters to avoid. Additionally, electric wires are nearly invisible, so people trip over or uproot them.

How a McGregor Fence Works

Mr. McGregor's Fence® creatively combines these barrier and electric elements by running electrically charged wires around a simple barrier fence at heights where the nose or paws of an exploring creature will find them. Any animal that manages to avoid the electrically charged wires is stopped by the barrier fence long enough to cause it to come up against the wires and get zapped. The harmless electric shock comes as a surprise, causing the animal to turn tail and exit.

Jonathan Leonard, the fence's inventor, installed the first prototype of this fence many years ago to protect his vegetable garden. The results were so impressive that he decided to make it more widely available. Leonard's hope was that it might ultimately revolutionize vegetable gardening by humanely resolving the small animal problem. And for its users, in a way capable of pleasing Beatrix Potter, it has done precisely that.

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